Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Medieval Japan Information Dig


Medieval Japan Information Dig

Directions, scour the internet and pull out ten events or topics that relate to medieval Japan (500 C.E. - 1500 C.E.).  For each entry, describe the event and includ when it happen if it is an event, or describe why it is important, if it is a topic.

Example:
N/AThe samurais used many cool hand-held weapons like swords.http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00716/



When?  
Describe the event/topic
Where did you find this information?
710 C.E.The city of Nara becomes Japan’s first permanent capital. http://goo.gl/9Nw78
300-1100 C.E
The earliest weapons introduced to the Japanese battlefield were from their early wars with Korea. Perhaps the most important of these being the (war) horse.
http://www.historum.com/asian-history/41200-early-japanese-warfare-c-300-1100-ce.html
300-645 C.EAt first there was only minor trade between China and Japan, the two countries traded pottery and bronze minted coins (Hall 30) The greatest amount of trade and diffusion of Chinese and Korean influence on Japan happened during the Yamato period (300-645 C.E.). This period was considered Japan’s introduction to the modern world, with the aid of China. In the sixth centaury the early stages of a centralized Japanese government began in the Yamato region of Japan, when the chiefs of the Japanese tribes, were united under the leadership of chieftains from the Sun Line (Hall 36).

http://www.samurai-archives.com/cde.htm
206-to 700 A.D.The first major account of cultural diffusion into Japanese culture, which can be found in recorded Japanese history, was between 206-to 700 A.D. during Japan’s Yayoi and Yamato period, by 200 A.D. Japan was slowly beginning trade negotiations with nearby China. There was a large contrast between Japan and its more modern trading partner. The Yayoi people of Japan were a tribal society, with the separate tribes spread across Japan.  Their main method of food procurement was through simple agriculture, using wooden farm implements combined with simple methods of bronze or iron smelting. One main feature of the Yayoi people was their unique pottery styles; pottery was created using a pottery wheel, which was an advanced technique at the time, portions of the pottery were also made up of rope like strands of clay called yayoi, hence the name of the culture (Japan 101). This was a contrast to China. Around the time of 200 A.D. during trades with Japan, China was having civil wars between three of their Kingdoms, in an attempt to unite the separate territories; along with many public works to procure a better water supply, there was also a relocation of China’s capitol (Lance 2003).

(710-784 C.E.).The newly reformed culture flourished well into the Nara period (710-784 C.E.). There were great efforts by the Imperial administration to record Japanese history and literature, with the use of the now widespread kanji system.http://www.samurai-archives.com/cde.html
710 C.E. (Japan-Guide 2004) The capitol of Nara, which emulated the Chinese layout, was finally finished in 710 C.E. (Japan-Guide 2004). Though not everything is meant to last. The reformed government that flourished through the Yamato and Nara periods, slowly began to degrade, its Chinese political roots also began to dissolvehttp://www.samurai-archives.com/cde.html
1000 C.E. By 1000 C.E. trade to China had slowed

down. Though the imperial family remained, and still had Buddhist influences, it slowly reorganized under its on design (Shikibu 1000). Though the ties to China had finally been severed, the countries influence had a lasting effect on Japan. Though its political influence disappeared, language, arts, religion and culture still remain to this day. It would not be until 550 years later, when through another trade agreement with foreigners, would Japanese culture again be affected.

http://www.samurai-archives.com/cde.html
500 to 1333Japan's emperor sent no troops to Korea, and in 562 Japan was forced from its possession in Korea that it called Mimana. The emperor had his doubts about the wisdom of adopting Buddhism, but he allowed the leader of the Soga clan to worship the Buddha privately as a trial. The Soga clan had been rising in influence, including marrying their daughters into the ruling Yamato family, and the Soga clan leader believed what the king of Paekche had said: that Buddhism was the religion of the most civilized. And he believed that Japan, therefore, should have it.
The Mononobe and Nakatomi succeeded in spreading hostility against Buddhism when, following the arrival of a Buddhist statue, disease spread among the Japanese. The epidemic was spoken of as a sign of the anger of the Shinto gods. The Soga temple at the palace was burned down. But this was followed by the epidemic becoming worse, which was taken as a sign of the anger and power of the Buddha. The Soga were allowed to maintain their adherence to Buddhism, and a few Buddhist monks arrrived from Korea, adding to a small Buddhist community at the capital
Japan's emperor sent no troops to Korea, and in 562 Japan was forced from its possession in Korea that it called Mimana. The emperor had his doubts about the wisdom of adopting Buddhism, but he allowed the leader of the Soga clan to worship the Buddha privately as a trial. The Soga clan had been rising in influence, including marrying their daughters into the ruling Yamato family, and the Soga clan leader believed what the king of Paekche had said: that Buddhism was the religion of the most civilized. And he believed that Japan, therefore, should have it.
The Mononobe and Nakatomi succeeded in spreading hostility against Buddhism when, following the arrival of a Buddhist statue, disease spread among the Japanese. The epidemic was spoken of as a sign of the anger of the Shinto gods. The Soga temple at the palace was burned down. But this was followed by the epidemic becoming worse, which was taken as a sign of the anger and power of the Buddha. The Soga were allowed to maintain their adherence to Buddhism, and a few Buddhist monks arrived from Korea, adding to a small Buddhist community at the capital
http://www.fsmitha.com/h3/h07japan.htm
1185-1600Japan (1185-1600) with its feudal structures offers a striking contrast to the earlier classical period of Japanese history: warfare and destruction characterize the medieval era in which samurai warriors became the rulers of the land.
The similarities as well as the differences in historical patterns of medieval Japan and medieval Europe are of interest to historians. Feudal political organization, bonds between warriors, and the prominence of religion are characteristic of the medieval periods in both societies.
http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/main_pop/kpct/kp_medievaljp.htm


600 - 1185
Medieval Japan is often well covered in textbooks because of its similarities to "medieval Europe," with warriors, castles, and feudal structures. Students gain a more balanced view of the breadth of Japanese history and its culture if teachers first introduce Japan's classical period (topic 5), c. 600 - 1185, which has quite different characteristics than those of the medieval period.
In medieval Japan, the rise of the samurai occurs as political power devolves from court nobles to warrior families; military leaders rule the land while the emperor and his court remain in place but hold no power. The supreme military leader is called the "Shogun," and his government is called the "bakufu," or "tent government”.
http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/m
710 to 784From 710 to 784 was a time of reforms. The whole of Japan (excluding areas where aborigines still lived) came under the discipline of the government in the capital. People paid taxes to the palace in the form of a percentage of what they grew, or in textiles, labor or military service. Roads linked Nara to provincial cities, and taxes were collected more efficiently. And land reform was created designed to help the common farmer.

c858 to 1160

The Fujiwara period in Japan's history is said to have begun in 858 and to have continued to 1160. At the emperor's court life was gay and there was devotion to the arts -- while the capital's aristocrats were losing political and economic control over the rest of the country. In the capital, paper makers, weavers, scroll painters, smiths and other specialists were developing their skills. Competition for land and resources between the aristocratic families was on the rise. Clans were expanding their estates and defying central authority -- much as the owners of estates in France were defying the authority of France's monarchs. And little defiance was necessary, as Japan's monarchical governments were inclined to leave the great landowning families alone.http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/m